Food You Can Feel Good About 

- Here at Purple Finch Café we do our best  to offer foods you can feel good about eating -

*Purple Finch is not a gluten free kitchen but we will make every attempt to meet your needs. Please remind your server to alert the kitchen of any allergens.
 

*We just switched to all GF marinades! now all protiens are GF including steak, chicken salad, turkey, grilled chicken!

PLEASE LOOK FOR *GF UPON REQUEST SYMBOLS THROUGHOUT THE REGULAR MENU. ALMOST ALL OF OUR MENU ITEMS CAN BE GF WITH A SLIGHT MODIFICATION. PLEASE ASK YOUR SERVER FOR DETAILS.

 (We offer Udi's brand wholegrain bread)

- What Good Food Means to Us! -

It’s simple. We know the food most people wish to consume on a daily basis includes fresh vegetables that were grown in the ground, without pesticides and growth hormones; grain and dairy products made with ingredients you’d find in your kitchen, not a laboratory. There are three common terms you may come across on our menu that you are probably familiar with but perhaps still confused by… All Natural, Organic and Fair Trade. This may help clear things up.

To use the term “organic” on a food package, farmers and manufacturers must verify through an independent auditing agency that production processes have met all the organic guidelines set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA-certified meat, dairy and egg products must come from animals that were given access to exercise, sunlight and, in the case of beef, pasture to graze in (though this access can be minimal). The animals cannot be treated with antibiotics or given hormones to supplement growth, and their feed must be certified organic and free from animal by-products and genetic modifications. USDA-certified organic produce comes from farms that have refrained from using synthetic herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers and genetically modified seeds for at least three years. For processed foods to be certified organic and bear the USDA emblem, they must contain at least 95% certified organic ingredients.

The USDA has a definition for “natural” meat and poultry, but it specifies how the animal product was processed rather than how the animal was raised. Farmers and manufacturers are allowed to label their meat and poultry products “natural” when they contain no added colors or artificial ingredients, haven’t been processed in such a way that “fundamentally alter(s) the raw product,” and if use of the term is explained (e.g., “minimally processed,”) on the package.

“Fair trade” by definition, is an organized social movement and market-based approach that aims to help producers in developing countries make better trading conditions and promote sustainability. The movement advocates the payment of a higher price to producers as well as higher social and environmental standards. It focuses in particular on exports from developing countries to developed countries, most notably handicrafts, coffee, cocoa, sugar, tea, bananas, honey, cotton, wine, fresh fruit, chocolate, flowers and gold.